bibliophylum

characterdesigninspiration:

Quite a few people requested some form of trait/personality generator, and here’s the result!  I wanted to keep it vague enough that the options could work for any universe, be it modern, fantasy, scifi, or anything else, so these are really just the basics. Remember that a character is much more than a list of traits, and this should only be used as a starting point– I tried to include a variety of things, but further development is definitely a must.

Could pair well with the gender and sexuality generator.

To Play: Click and drag each gif, or if that isn’t working/you’re on mobile, just take a screenshot of the whole thing (multiple screenshots may be required if you want more than one trait from each category).

journaling-junkie

writeworld:

 By Robert Brockway

Writing is serious business, full of mental anguish, studious contemplation, philosophical brooding, and bullshit. Listen: If your every literary moment is spent agonizing unhappily over your creation — just quit. If you’re going to be unhappy with your pastimes anyway, take up carpentry. Even a shitty, crooked spice rack will keep the oregano from cluttering up the cabinets. If you’re writing, you should have the decency to enjoy it. Remember: All you’re doing is transcribing imagination time. Don’t take it too seriously. Writing is a game, and if you’re stuck on a level, the solution isn’t to grind through it — just cheat. Here are a few simple cheat codes to get you started, and maybe unfuck your creativity love enough for you to finish that masterwork about a boy and his homosexual robot dog. And if you try any of these, feel free to post the results in the comments. Because that’s the other important aspect of being a writer: the shameless attention whoring.

  1. Brutally End Your Story
  2. Drive Your Story Insane
  3. Abandon Your Story
  4. Cheat on Your Story
  5. Steal Somebody Else’s Story


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yahighway
When in doubt, the rule of threes is a rule that plays well with all of storytelling. When describing a thing? No more than three details. A character’s arc? Three beats. A story? Three acts. An act? Three sequences. A plot point culminating in a mystery of a twist? At least three mentions throughout the tale. This is an old rule, and a good one. It’s not universal — but it’s a good place to start. –
Chuck Wendig (via beccaandbooks)
bibliophylum

maxkirin:

Hello, writerly friends~ ♥︎

You asked for a Writing Advice Masterpost, so here it is! Below you will find a collection of the best questions and answers from the last two years. Not only that, but they are also organized so you can find the answers to your questions quickly and get on with writing.

But wait, there is more!

This post is more than just a collection of advice, it’s a nexus for writing advice, resources, and information! That’s right, this post is going to grow over time. I will be updating this masterpost WEEKLY with new answers, writing advice videos, playlists, and more! So, make sure to bookmark this page and follow my blog (maxkirin.tumblr.com) so you don’t miss a thing~ ♥︎

Prompts

Virtual Writing Academy

Motivation & Inspiration

Planning, Outlining, and Getting Started

Dialogue

Editing & Revision

Hot Button Issues

General Advice

Publishing

Writing Music & Playlists

Miscellaneous

Last Updated: 08-02-14. Click HERE to see the latest update. Latest posts are in Italics.